Collision of Visions (Part 2)

When atoms collide they often release extra energy as a light wave.

colliding atoms

I think the same thing must be true of colliding visions.

The collision of Heart Working Women and Gramma’s House created greater light and clearer vision for women’s ministry in Central Western Pennsylvania.

Joy was ready to seek non-profit incorporation for Heart Working Women  when she arrived in Purchase Line last November, and I was eager to pass on the In His Hand by-laws for her use.  The IHH by-laws, I thought, would be a helpful guide since they had already passed legal examination in the incorporation process.  I had only one request: I asked her to keep Ken Sande’s Peacemaker Pledge in her final document.  A light wave released and we saw the mighty hand of God.  Joy rejoiced in my request because she is a Certified Instructor for Ken Sande’s Relational Wisdom ministry.

We realized that we shared a passion to see believers live in the provision of Christ’s high priestly prayer in John 17.  The vision God gave me focused more on the outward expression of Christian unity.  I imagined what would happen if the world could see that we are one as the Son and the Father are one.  The vision God gave Joy focused more on the inward expression of Christian unity.  She imagined what would happen if wounded and weary saints would seek to be one with the Father and Son.  I see the body as a whole relating to the world; she sees the individual cells that make up the body relating to each other.  I see our skin; she sees our internal organs.  We both see our one Lord, one faith, one God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in us all.

And it is to that one God and Father in us all that we pray for a place and a name in our community.

The building that recently housed Tony’s Small Engine Repair (245 Franklin Street) in Clymer is for sale for $150,000.

tb street view

Tony’s Small Engine Repair, 245 Franklin Street in Clymer

It is spacious and open to easily accommodate any ministry we envision together.  tb show room The front has plenty of room for the things that Heart Working Women might imagine doing together at Gramma’s House

like cooking, crafting , sewing,

and teaching, learning, growing.

tb front room

There is room for a shared kitchen,

a Wi-Fi café,

a tea room,

 

 

with little nooks for bookshelves

tb shelves

and secluded conversation.

 

 

But there is so much more! 

Above is a family-sized apartment,

tb apartmenttb sink and stove

and in the back there is a large garage with an added storage area

where hard-working men can gather

to imagine how the Lord wants to use them to bless the community as well. tb garage The possibilities are limited only by the scope of our constantly colliding imaginations.

tb office

Tony’s office

The colliding visions of Heart Working Women and Gramma’s House give us clear direction for ministry now.  We are reaching out to women especially, learning how deepening relationships brings us closer to the unity of the body of Christ.  We do not need any particular building to continue the work He has laid before us.  But if the Lord wants us to have a building as a tangible expression of that unity, we can trust Him to speak to His people to make it so.

We ask only that you listen for His call and imagine!

Imagine a place where congregations connect, and network, and serve together with a power we don’t have whenever we work apart.

Imagine a place where the visions of the believers in our community constantly collide to release ever more and more light into the surrounding darkness.

Imagine a place where young people discover the wonders of the lost art of homemaking and learn the blessings shouldering God ordained responsibility.

Imagine a place where lonely, hurting people just drop in and find Jesus through His people waiting to show His love in great ways and small.

Imagine a place where our neighbors know they will find the church with her apron on, serving her Lord throughout the week in the routine activities of daily life.

If you think this idea is so crazy that you dismiss it, I understand.  If you think this idea is crazy but you are still willing to pray for us, we thank God for every faithful intercessor.  If you think this idea is crazy, but you still want to be updated, let us know here at Grammas’ Guide, at the Heart Working Women website, or find me and/or Joy on Facebook.

And if by His grace, you recognize God speaking in our visions, hopes, and dreams, join us in the glorious quest to restore hearts and homes, with or without a building dedicated to that purpose.

For the vision is yet for an appointed time;
But at the end it will speak, and it will not lie.
Though it tarries, wait for it;
Because it will surely come,
It will not tarry.

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Ultimate Obedience

Black and White Hands

After two years of avoidance, I have returned to blogging. My impetus is the result of a CT scan which shows the metastatic breast cancer that I have been battling for 14 years has expanded in my liver and started its deadly assault on my lungs.  This wasn’t a surprise, but it’s a long story that I don’t plan to tell now. I am writing again simply to capture the vision that invaded my dreams decades ago and refuses to die. I don’t have that option:  I am going to die, (probably sooner rather than later), so I will spend the last days of my life writing about a vision that existed long before me and will live on long after my body decomposes in the earth.

The vision at its foundation is simply John 17, and the Lord’s repeated statement that we may be one as the Father and Son are one.  He doesn’t ask God to make us one; He simply states that they may be made one as if it is the assured outcome and the purpose of everything He does ask.  The first time I seriously considered those words nearly forty years ago, I believed that Christ’s prayer had been answered in the affirmative. No other option made sense to me, and it still doesn’t.  When the Son asked the Father to keep the disciples through His name, to keep them from the evil one, and to sanctify them in truth, did the Father say “no”?  Of course not! And being kept and sanctified means that we may be one. So what’s the problem?  Obviously, it’s us!  Obviously, we have chosen for one reason or another not to enter a spiritual reality that Christ provided as His final blessing on the disciples during His last hours in mortal flesh.

The church was born in the heart of that reality.  On the day of Pentecost they were all gathered in one place and in one accord and we know what happened.  Through the early days the believers broke bread daily and had all things in common.  We know from the New Testament, that it didn’t take long for the newly converted to take their eyes off of Christ and begin to focus on other things like the law, or their leaders, or who wasn’t getting their fair share of food distributions. Tragically, history tells us that the Lord’s plan for His disciples to be one as the Father and the Son are one has often been lost in bickering, battles, and bloodshed among believers.

The experience of universal Christian unity was lost within a relatively short period of time. Segregation by doctrine, denomination, and different cultures became normal in a body of believers called to be one as the Father and the Son are one. Knowledge of universal Christian unity faded from the church.  Many if not most Christians believe that John 17 is a promise for life after death.  But that just doesn’t make sense.  Read the prayer.  The purpose of our perfect unity in Christ serves to protect us from the evil one as we are sent into the world.  It provides evidence to the world that the Father sent the Son, and that He loves us as He loves His Son.  Neither will be necessary in the world to come.

We have lost the precious knowledge of Christ’s plan, provision, and power in unity.  But lost knowledge can be rediscovered. In my lifetime, in my small circle of experience, I have seen God bring down walls between Catholic and Protestant, between Methodist, Baptist, and Brethren.  And whatever He is doing around me, He is doing throughout the world. The burden I have carried nearly four decades convinces me that the time has come for the knowledge of Christ’s provision for unity among His disciples to be rediscovered and experienced once more.

Just read John 17 carefully. Think about the cross looming just ahead. Think about Christ’s last minutes with His disciples. Think of Him praying for the work they have been given. Think what might happen if all who claim His name actually believed that His repeated statement is spiritual reality.

Praise God for our blind spots

If the whole body were an eye…

 

 

All my life I have despised my blind spots! I can’t tell you how often I’ve ranted and railed at the God of the universe telling Him blind spots are a very, very bad thing for Him to allow in His children. Why, O Lord, why do you show my blind spots to everyone in the world but me? What kind of a sense does it make?

This morning in the wee hours, God finally answered my decades-old question. I now see His purpose, His plan, and His providential provision in my blind spots.  I still hate them.  I want them all to be removed, but I finally understand their use in the kingdom of God.

My epiphany came as two seemingly unrelated events converged in my life. The first one is the ongoing debate between N.T. Wright and John Piper on Paul’s perspective of justification. The second is my initial attempt to serve as a Critique Partner for a fellow author.

But before I describe the convergence of doctrinal debate with manuscript critique, I must step back to clarify the truth—or rather the lack thereof—in my repeated rant toward God. It is true that I have cried out “Why do you permit everyone but me to see my blind spots?” in the kind of Davidic hyperbole that fits so well in a lament.  However, it is not true that God shows my blind spots to everyone.  He does not show anyone’s blind spots to everyone.  If He did, we could have no false teaching in the church, no congregation would follow a leader who strays, and each of us would be corrected immediately whenever we step out of line.

Perhaps I should instead cry out, “Why, O Lord, why don’t you show everyone my blind spots so I never have to worry or wonder whether I’ve got something right?” Fortunately, this time I don’t have to spend decades waiting for the answer because it’s the same for both questions: Our blind spots are God’s tools to refine our relationships with each other and with Him.

I begin with the premise that all human beings (with the single exception of the Incarnate Lord Himself) have blind spots throughout our lives, and we must acknowledge that fact before they can be removed.  Our blind spots remind us that we are totally dependent members of His body. No one, not Peter, not Paul, not John the beloved had or has a corner on the Truth. Together we have the mind of Christ, but alone we are just neurons randomly firing across synapses.

1 Corinthians 12 tells us plainly how gross we become when we choose to live in isolation with our blind spots rather than seek the unity Christ provided through His intercession in John 17.  Imagine what it would be like if someday your foot suddenly says, “Because I am not a hand, I am not of your body.” And then your ear says, “Because I am not an eye, I am not of your body.”  Next your eye says to the hand, “I have no need of you”; and your head says to the feet, “I have no need of you.”

There is a reason we find disembodied body parts horrifying, and we should keep that image in mind whenever we feel inclined to distance ourselves from other members in the body of Christ.

That brings me back to the Wright/Piper debate on justification, but that is the subject of my next post.

Watching #shadowyconservativegroups trend is #myguiltypleasure

My philosophy of government has been libertarian since 1992 when I first read Leonard E. Read’s The Elements of Libertarian Leadership. So on May 30, when I saw #shadowyconservativegroups flash by in my Twitter home stream with libertarian sentiments attached, I was intrigued.  I typed the hashtag into TweetChat, and I watched it trend with guilty pleasure until only retweets filled the screen.

The pleasure comes because so many individuals seem to understand that personal responsibility and limited government are required elements of liberty. The guilt comes because I know that tweeting against the way President Obama and Congress are expanding socialism in our country is not the way to recover our lost liberties.

I wrote about why I think libertarian-atheist is an oxymoron during my short association with examiner.com. Sometime soon, I will post the gist of those articles here on Grammas’ Guide. But for now I will start with the a priori statement: Liberty—spiritual, emotional, political—is totally dependent on our Creator. We will have civil liberty only when Christians realize that our collective goal cannot be to reform the government. It must be to radically obey God.

Of course if we are obedient to our high calling in Jesus Christ, we can be sure that hearts will be transformed. And since everyone in government has a heart, we might even see our government transformed as well. But that’s just an agreeable consequence of our faithfulness. It is not a primary goal for the Christian.

For thirty-five years I’ve been convinced that the secret to seeing the Church triumphant is distilled for us in our Lord’s high priestly prayer in John 17.

I do not pray for these alone, but also for those who will believe in Me through their word; that they all may be one, as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; that they also may be one in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me. And the glory which You gave Me I have given them, that they may be one just as We are one: I in them, and You in Me; that they may be made perfect in one, and that the world may know that You have sent Me, and have loved them as You have loved Me.

He made provision for our unity, and that unity is His means for displaying His glory. God wants our unity to be a witness to the world that the Father sent the Son and loves us as He loves His Son. How it must break the heart of God to see His children still caught in the same trap that divided the Corinthians into Paulites, Apolloites, and Cephasites. (1 Corinthians 1:10-13) If we want to live in liberty, we must learn to come together by His Spirit. We must stop dividing His body and destroying our witness because of our political philosophies, pet doctrines, or worship styles.  

I will probably smile guiltily again whenever I see conservatives  playing hashtags games on Twitter.  But I will also pray with Christ that we will be one as He is one with His Father.  I will pray that Christian conservatives & Christian liberals, Christian independents & Christian party loyalists, Christian libertarians & Christian socialists will all join our Lord in His prayer that we will be made perfect in one.

When that happens we can be certain that, no matter what is going on in Washington, the Lord will keep us in perfect peace because our minds will be fixed on Him. (Isaiah 26:3)